Wednesday 27th September 2017.

Route. Callado de las Zorros,Puerto de Garuchal, Los Pareja, Colado Ginovinos and return. Distance 18 kilometres. Height difference 350 metres. 

We met at the Conejo negro (Black Rabbit) restaurant at Callado de Zorros, (Quiet Foxes).

Following the compulsory drink of coffee, at 10.30am, seven of us set off in an easterly direction taking a short climb along the Sierra de los Villares ridge. Before a long gradual descent along the valley side, we paused to compare the view over the flat land in the direction of the Mar Menor to the South and the rugged mountain landscape to the North.

Following our descent into the valley the true path has been blocked for a couple of years by a wire fence. A sign clearly states that this is to protect the bee population. This is not a problem as there is a parallel path nearby. 

Pressing on we eventually reached an abandoned and derelict farm with a domed water storage cistern. The first to look inside caught sight of an 18” snake just before it slithered under a large stone. Some were sorry they missed the snake, others were not!

Moving on to Colado Ginovinos and crossing the Sucina road, we ascended the forestry road up onto the ridge and then made a turn to the left to the plateau summit, where we stopped for lunch. 

There were obvious signs that someone had been trying to attract wild boar. The ground had a layer of straw spread over it. Under this was corn from the cob. A hide had been set up complete with camouflaged screens, folding seats and a patio umbrella. The seats came in useful for those who had not brought along their own seating mat. There were excellent views from this vantage point, as can be seen in the photographs.

Reluctantly we returned the way we had come, opting only to stay in the valley back to Garuchal, past the Hacienda which had suffered some bullet holes during the civil war.
We arrived back at the Black Rabbit at 3.40pm. 

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